About the Antique Rugs of the Future Project

Sheep Breeds of Azerbaijan

Shearing,
Sorting, Washing, Carding, Spinning

"The advantages of handspun yarn to machine spun yarn"

Rediscovery of Ancient Natural Dyes
Our Natural Dyestuffs

Mordants

Difference between synthetically and naturally dyed rugs

Weaving and Finishing Steps

Galleries of ARFP Caucasian Azerbaijani Rugs
 

 

 

 


boteh/buta element may have different meanings in the different cultures: Zoroastrian flame, shrub, Scythian decorative motif, a bird, flower, cypress tree etc. 

Shirvan Medallion Gubba rug
CODE: SHRGBB01
Size (metric): 88x177cm
Size (ft): 2'11"x5'9"
Area: 1.55 m2
Density: 180 000 knots per square meter, totally ~280 000 knots
Weaving period: three months

Colors (11):
light blue (variegated), red (brick), salmon red, medium madder red, obergine, royal blue, variegated green, gold yellow, medium blue (Persian blue), natural ivory, natural brown.

Dyes
: 100% natural dyes: madder, weld (Reseda Luteola), indigo, pomegranate skins, walnut husks, natural brown sheep wool, natural ivory sheep wool
Materials: Handcarded and handspun wool for pile, wool warps and cotton wefts

Handwoven in Azerbaijan

Design:  The indigo field scattered with various polychrome floral, animal and geometric minor motifs around the central stepped medallion, in an ivory-green ground main border and outer dragon motif minor borders


The serrated/saw-edged medallions (flame, gubba, gubpa) have been related by some authors to ancient Egyptian and Persian Royal insignia.

 

Contact us for more information about this rug

 



Apple Flower Motif




 


Grape Leaf




 



 


Mythological animal motif




 


 


Boteh, Tree of Life and Dragon ("S") symbols


Buta/Boteh has been used in Iran, Central Asia and Caucasus since the Sassanid Dynasty (AD 224 to AD 651). Some design scholars believe the Boteh is the convergence of a stylized floral spray and a cypress tree: a Zoroastrian symbol of life and eternity. A floral motif called Buteh, which originated in the Sassanid Dynasty (200650 AD) of Iran and later in the Safavid Dynasty (from 1501 to 1736), was a major textile pattern in Iran and Caucasus during the Qajar Dynasty.

In these periods, the pattern was used to decorate royal regalia, crowns, and court garments, as well as textiles used by the general population. According to Azerbaijani historians, the design comes from ancient times of Zoroastrianism and is an expression of the essence of that religion. It subsequently became a decorative element widely used in Azerbaijani culture and architecture.

The pattern is still popular in Iran and South and Central Asian countries. It is woven using gold or silver threads on silk or other high quality textiles for gifts, for weddings and special occasions.

The usage of the pattern goes beyond clothing paintings, jewelry, frescoes, curtains, tablecloths, quilts, carpets, garden landscaping, and pottery also sport the buta design in Azerbaijan, Iran and Central Asia.

Buta/Boteh is also one of the most important ornamental motifs of Mughal Indian art, consisting of a floral spray with stylized leaves and flowers. It is used in architecture and painting and in textiles, enamels, and almost all other decorative arts. The motif began to gain importance in the reign of the Mughal emperor Jahangir (160527). read more at www.azerbaijanrugs.com/arfp-shirvan-marasali-boteh-prayer-rug-111x153cm.htm






 


 


fertility symbol

 


 

For more information about the above rug or to place an order please email vd@azerbaijanrugs.com (Baku, Azerbaijan) or ra@azerbaijanrugs.com  (San Francisco Bay Area). We will get back to you within 24 hours or less.