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Cairene floral carpet

 

Sotheby's Sale: N07919 | Location: New York
Auction Dates: Session 1: Fri, 19 Sep 03 10:15 AM

LOT 27 (of 108)
A CAIRENE RUG, OTTOMAN EGYPT
DATE OF OBJECT
late 16th century

5,0007,000 USD
Lot Sold. Hammer Price with Buyer's Premium: 5,400 USD

measurements: approximately 6ft. 3in. by 4ft. 3in. (1.90 by 1.29m.)

CATALOGUE NOTE
In 1517 Egypt became part of the Ottoman Empire and all aspects of Egyptian culture became increasingly dominated by the Turkish style. Cairene carpets had previously displayed geometric Mamluk designs but during the 16th century their rectilinear drawing was replaced by a curvilinear Ottoman style introducing floral ornaments and saz leaves, motifs commonly seen on contemporaneous Turkish ceramics and architectural elements. Although the appearance of such carpets would seem to suggest an Anatolian workshop, their asymmetrically knotted structure and restrained palette are directly related to Mamluk production and to their having originated within an Egyptian workshop. For a related Ottoman rug see: Dimand, M. S. and Mailey, J., Oriental Rugs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1973, Cat. No. 109, Fig. 192, pp.204 and 234.


CATALOGUE NOTE
In 1517 Egypt became part of the Ottoman Empire and all aspects of Egyptian culture became increasingly dominated by the Turkish style. Cairene carpets had previously displayed geometric Mamluk designs but during the 16th century their rectilinear drawing was replaced by a curvilinear Ottoman style introducing floral ornaments and saz leaves, motifs commonly seen on contemporaneous Turkish ceramics and architectural elements. Although the appearance of such carpets would seem to suggest an Anatolian workshop, their asymmetrically knotted structure and restrained palette are directly related to Mamluk production and to their having originated within an Egyptian workshop. For a related Ottoman rug see: Dimand, M. S. and Mailey, J., Oriental Rugs in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1973, Cat. No. 109, Fig. 192, pp.204 and 234



Image and information courtesy: John Taylor, rugtracker.com