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A late 18th century Karabagh rug, Late Khanate Period, Azerbaijan


A SOUTH CAUCASIAN CARPET
PROBABLY KARABAGH, 18TH OR EARLY 19TH CENTURY

Price Realized 3,750 ($5,918)

Sale Information
Christie's Sale 5988
Christie's Interiors - Style and Spirit
28 September 2010
London, South Kensington

Lot Notes
Lot Description
20-A SOUTH CAUCASIAN CARPET
PROBABLY KARABAGH, 18TH OR EARLY 19TH CENTURY
approx: 8 ft. 6 in. x 7 ft. (259 x 213 cm.)

Provenance
Anonymous sale, Sotheby's New York, 16 December 1993, lot 127.
Literature
Robert de Calatchi, Oriental Carpets, Fribourg, 1967, page 102, pl.43

When this South Caucasian carpet (lot 20) was published by Robert de Calatchi (Oriental Carpets, 1967), it was noted as having similar characteristics in design associating it with Tibet and a Central Asian origin was proposed. A more obvious link can be seen with Caucasian embroideries of 18th century such as that sold through Christie's London, 11 February 1998, lot 82, which has the same angularity and colouring but different design. The design elements of this rug can be seen in other Caucasian embroideries, (Kirchem Heinrich, et al Orient Stars, Stuttgart & London, 1993, pl.48, page 74. While some other Caucasian pile carpets share the vertical attenuation of the design elements and the white ground, none have the same design. Comparisons, can however be drawn with a carpet in Orient Stars, pl.61, page 126, together with a small group of similar rugs. In contrast to those rugs however, the present rug has a cotton foundation, this while rare is not unknown in early Caucasian weavings, it is also much more frequently found in weavings originating from just over the present-day border into Persia and in this respect it should be remembered that the area was at that time also under Persian control.